Tag Archive | Antinomianism

9 Marks of a Declining Church

Ruinas de Iglesia antigua en Trzęsacz, Polonia (2015)

http://www.freechurchcontinuing.org/publications/articles/item/nine-marks-of-a-declining-church

The Unbeliever is Already Condemned in the Gospel-Court

Ebenezer Erskine, Works, 1:383:

The unbeliever is already condemned in the gospel-court. Now, do not mistake this way of speaking, as if, when I speak of the gospel-court, I meant, that the gospel, strictly considered, condemned any man: the gospel, like its glorious Author, “comes not into the world to condemn the world, but that the world, through” it, “might be saved.” Neither do I mean, as if there were new precepts and penalties in the gospel, considered in a strict sense, which were never found in the book or court of the law. This is an assertion which has laid the foundation for a train of damnable and soul-ruining errors; as of the Antinomian error, in discarding the whole moral law as a rule of obedience under the gospel; the Baxterian error, of an evangelical righteousness different from the imputed righteousness of Christ; the Pelagian and Arminian error, of a sufficient grace given to every man that hears the gospel, to believe and repent by his own power.

Source: https://www.puritanboard.com/threads/why-does-limited-atonement-matter.87650/page-3, Comment 74

Either Gross Ignorance or Malignant Opposition

John Murray, “Law and Grace:”

It is symptomatic of a pattern of thought current in many evangelical circles that the idea of keeping the commandments of God is not consonant with the liberty and spontaneity of the Christian man, that keeping the law has its affinities with legalism and with the principle of works rather than with the principle of grace. It is strange indeed that this kind of antipathy to the notion of keeping commandments should be entertained by any believer who is a serious student of the New Testament. Did not our Lord say, ‘If ye love me, ye will keep my commandments’ (John 14:15)? And did he not say, ‘If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love, even as I have kept my Father’s commandments and abide in his love’ (John 15:10)? It was John who recorded these sayings of our Lord and it was he, of all the disciples, who was mindful of the Lord’s teaching and example regarding iove, and reproduces that teaching so conspicuously in his first Epistle. We catch something of the tenderness of his entreaty when he writes, ‘Little children, let us not love in word, neither in tongue, but in deed and truth’ (I John 3:18), ‘Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God” (I John 4:7). But the message oi John has escaped us if we have failed to note John’s emphasis upon the keeping of the commandments of God. ‘And by this we know that we know him, if we keep his commandments. He that says, I know him, and does not keep his commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him. But whoso keeps his word, in him verily the iove of God is made perfect’ (I John 2:3-5). ‘Beloved, if our heart does not condemn, we have confidence toward God, and whatsoever we ask we receive from him, because we keep his commandments and do those things that are well-pleasing in his sight . . . And he who keeps his commandments abides in him and he in him’ (I John 3:21, 22, 24). ‘For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments’ (I John 5:3). If we are surprised to find this virtual identification of love to God and the keeping of his commandments, it is because we have overlooked the words of our Lord himself which John had remembered and learned well: ‘If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love’ (John 15:10) and ‘He that hath my commandments and keepeth them, he it is that loveth me’ (John 14:21). To say the very least, the witness of our Lord and the testimony of John are to the effect that there is indispensable complementation; love will be operative in the keeping of God’s commandments. It is only myopia that prevents us from seeing this, and when there is a persistent animosity to the notion of keeping commandments the only conclusion is that there is either gross ignorance or malignant opposition to the testimony of Jesus.

~originally a part of  the Payton Lectures delivered by Professor Murray in March of 1955 at Fuller Theological Seminary. The entire lecture series was expanded and reprinted by Wm. B Eerdmans Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, Michigan in 1957 in book form with the title, Principles of Conduct: Aspects of Biblical Ethics by John Murray.

Read more of what John Murray has to say on how the law and the gospel interrelate here: http://www.the-highway.com/lawgrace.html

Immutable and Universally Obligatory

Amongst professing Christians in the West today, there seems to be a belief that God requires us to follow no law but the law to love one another (defined without respect to any of God’s stated commands).  Here is a quote from William Findley that I came across while reading on another topic that shows that Christians once acknowledged the perpetuity of the Ten Commandments:

800px-Bloomington_-_Grace_Fellowship_Assembly_of_God_-_commandments_-_P1040521“As a clear and exact knowledge of the moral law of nature is peculiarly important, in order to understand the whole system of revealed [8] religion, I will state, that it pleased God to deliver, on Mount Sinai, a compendium of this holy law, and to write it with his own hand, on durable tables of stone. This law, which is commonly called the ten commandments, or decalogue, has its foundation in the nature of God and of man, in the relation men bear to him, and to each other, and in the duties which result from those relations; and on this account it is immutable and universally obligatory. Though given in this manner to Israel, as the foundation of the national covenant, then about to be entered into, it demands obedience from all mankind, at all times, and in all conditions of life; and the whole world will finally be judged according to it, and to the opportunity they had of being acquainted with it, whether by reason and tradition alone, or by the light of the written word. This law is spiritual, reaching to the thoughts and intents of the heart. It is necessarily the foundation of all transactions, between the Creator and his rational creatures; and, in this case, was very properly revealed, as the foundation of the covenant of peculiarity with Israel. See Scott on Exod. xx. This was incorporated in the judicial law, as far as divine wisdom thought proper, and is explained and applied by the Saviour, and by the prophets and apostles.”

~William Findley, Observations on “The Two Sons of Oil” (LF ed.) [1812], Chapter 1, Editor: John Caldwell, available online at http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/findley-observations-on-the-two-sons-of-oil-lf-ed

We Desire To Obey The Lord In All Things

Rombergpark-Ginster-IMG 2433

“Very great mistakes have been made about the law. Not long ago there were those about us who affirmed that the law is utterly abrogated and abolished, and they openly taught that believers were not bound to make the moral law the rule of their lives. What would have been sin in other men they counted to be no sin in themselves. From such Antinomianism as that may God deliver us. We are not under the law as the method of salvation, but we delight to see the law in the hand of Christ, and desire to obey the Lord in all things.”

~Spurgeon, “The Perpetuity of the Law of God,” http://www.angelfire.com/va/sovereigngrace/perpetuity.spurgeon.html

Antinomian Errors

William Young, Reformed Thought: Selected Writings of William Young, Antinomianism, Pg. 61-62:

2nd century Hebrew decalogueThe following may be considered as a series of antinomian errors, constituting a sketch of such a system as has been approximated in the course of history:

1. The law is made void by grace. Justification by faith alone renders good works unnecessary.

2. Since good works are unnecessary, obedience to the Law is not required of justified persons.

3. God sees no sin in the justified, who are no longer bound by the law, and is not displeased with them if they sin.

4. God therefore does no chastise justified persons for sin.

5. Nor can sin in any way injure the justified.

6. Since no duties or obligations are admitted in the gospel, faith and repentance are not commanded.

7. The Christian need not repent in order to receive pardon of sin.

8. Nor need he mortify sin; Christ has mortified sin for him.

9. Nor ought he be distressed in conscience upon backsliding, but he should hold fast to a full assurance of his salvation in the midst of the vilest sins.

10. Justifying faith is the assurance that one is already justified.

11. The elect are actually justified before they believe, even from all eternity.

12. Therefore, they were never children of wrath or under condemnation.

13. Their sin, as to its very being, was imputed to Christ so as not to be theirs, and His holiness is imputed to them as their only sanctification.

14. Sanctification is no evidence of justification, for assurance is the fruit of an immediate revelation that one is an elect person.

15. No conviction by the law precedes the sinner’s closing with Christ, inasmuch as Christ is freely offered to sinners as sinners.

16. Repentance is produced not by the law, but by the gospel only.

17. The secret counsel of God is the rule of man’s conduct.

18. God is the author and approver of sin, for sin is the accomplishment of His will.

19. Unless the Spirit works holiness in the soul, there is no obligation to be holy or to strive toward that end.

20. All externals are useless or indifferent, since the Spirit alone gives life.

HT: https://renopres.com/2016/11/11/antinomianism-some-errors/

 

Under a Fearful Delusion

I am much troubled by the rampant antinomianism and blatant disrespect for God’s moral law amongst professing Christians today.  Here a quote from J.C. Ryle that should give people pause:

Ten Commandments in front of Chiefland City Hall“Genuine sanctification will show itself in habitual respect to God’s law, and habitual effort to live in obedience to it as the rule of life.  There is no greater mistake than to suppose that a Christian has nothing to do with the law and the ten commandments, because he cannot be justified by keeping them.  The same Holy Ghost who convinces the believer of sin by the law, and leads him to Christ for justification, will always lead him to a spiritual use of the law, as a friendly guide, in the pursuit of sanctification.  Our Lord Jesus Christ never made light of the ten commandments; on the contrary, in his first public discourse, the Sermon on the Mount, he expounded them, and showed the searching nature of their requirements.  St Paul never made light of the law: on the contrary, he says, “The law is good, if a man use it lawfully.’ – ‘I delight in the law of God after the inward man’ (1 Tim. 1:8; Rom 7:22).  He that pretends to be a saint, while he sneers at the ten commandments, and things nothing of lying, hypocrisy, swindling, ill-temper, slander, drunkenness, and breach of the seventh commandment, is under a fearful delusion.  He will find is hard to prove that he is a ‘saint’ in the last day!”

~J.C. Ryle, Holiness, Chapter 2